June 16, 2016

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by: Ben M Roberts

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Tags: motivation, online reviews, Ratings, Reviews

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Categories: Ratings and Reviews

How do you motivate your staff to take online reviews seriously?

It is all well and good people like me and and other commentators to talk about how powerful ratings and reviews can be for your business, but really when it comes down to it, it can be much harder to actually get buy in from everyone else in the company, even if the highest level managers and directors make it policy.
Even in the company I work for where there is already a culture of high level customer service, and a culture of encouraging ratings and reviews, it is hard to keep all the staff constantly motivated, after all people are always need something to keep them interested.
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
Let’s think about something simple like Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. People fall at different levels depending on the situation they are in, or the task they are doing. For some people motivation will come from simply satisfying customers and knowing they are happy. However, other members of staff could be more motivated by other means be in tangible or intangible. Before I go on with some ideas on how you can motivate these people, I would like to point out that I am not saying that they don’t get satisfaction from helping customers, but it may not always be the biggest motivational factor for them . . .

The Little Things

For many people it’s the little things that matter. Something like a personal message from the boss for the person that gets the most mentions in reviews for a given week. Or maybe even an actual prize? Something like wine, chocolates or gift vouchers. To some people this may sound stupid, but for others it really is a motivational factor.
For some organisations and businesses it may not be fair or really easy to give individuals rewards or “perks” for positive reviews. With the company I work for this is exactly the case, so instead of rewarding individuals there is a collective company wide reward. It’s not a big thing it is essentially free lunch on a Thursday if we have a full 5* week on Trustpilot. There are of course other things that feed in and out, like when we get a 3* rating but everything in the review section is positive. This is something down to the individual business, but you get the idea.

People are motivated by money

Money doesn’t necessarily make you happy, but it is undoubtedly a motivational factor. It could be cold hard cash, it could be bonuses, either way some people will definitely see this as a motivator. I mean seriously if you saw you could earn and extra few hundred / thousand dollars or pounds a year if you were able to get over a certain number of positive reviews would you not pay it more attention than if there was no incentive?

Blend the two

As with almost everything there isn’t a one size fits all approach. Depending on the people in your organisation, and depending one the size, type of business you may need differing or blends of options. You can suss this out in to ways, firstly by looking at your finances then by discussing it with your team to see which option they prefer. Or you could test by trial and error. Offer a different incentive a week to see which one appears to get the best rewards. Personally this idea isn’t my favourite, I prefer option one but that’s just me.
I hope you’ve enjoyed this article! IF so please feel free to share it, and if you have any comments or questions please feel free to comment below or drop me a message!